The ABC’s of a
Japanese Unit
(Objectives and ideas on how to
teach Japan in the classroom.)

A.  Abacus
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the history of the abacus, where it came from, and how it is used.
2.        The students will create an abacus in groups.
3.        The students will use the abacus to calculate Math problems given by the teacher.

B.  Buddha
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the two main religions in Japan. (Shinto and Buddhism)
2.        The students will compare and contrast their own religions with those of Japan.
3.        The students will create a Religion Book that includes the religions of Japan and the United States.

C.  Carp
Objectives:
1.         The students will research the ancient customs, celebrations and traditions, as well as, any modern customs, celebrations and traditions.  
(Compare/Contrast)
2.        The boy students will participate in the celebration of the carp by making carp and sharing stories of bravery and strength.

D.  Doll’s Festival
Objectives:
1.         The students will research the ancient customs, celebrations and traditions, as well as, any modern customs, celebrations and traditions.  
(Compare/Contrast)
2.        The girl students will participate in the celebration of the Doll’s Festival by bringing in their favorite doll to school to be placed on display.  The   
girls will discuss how the festival takes places in Japan, and make a doll puppet.
3.        The students will learn about different types of dolls in Japan. (ex. Kokeshi Dolls)
4.        The student will be able to envision total form (front, back, and sides) by creating three-dimensional forms of a Kokeshi doll.
5.        The student will repeat shapes to design a pattern for a Kokeshi doll.

E.  Emperor
Objectives:
1.         The students will create a time line of important historical facts about Japan.
2.         The students will research the social order and changes in government.
3.         The students will research the ancient customs, celebrations and traditions, as well as, any modern customs, celebrations and traditions.

F.  Family
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the homes of Japan, both ancient and modern day.
2.        The students will create a model of a traditional home of Japan.
3.        The students will research the Japanese family crest.
4.        The students will create their own family crest.

G.  Government of Japan
Objectives:
1.        The students will create a book with information about the government of Japan.  
2.        The students will explore what changes have been made since 1947 in the Japanese government.
3.        The students will learn about  Japan’s three branches of government.  They will also compare and contrast it to the United States’ government.

H.  History of Education in Japan
Objectives:
1.        The student will gain knowledge about the educational system in Japan.
2.        The student will compare and contrast it to the system in the United States.

I.  Islands
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the four main islands that make up the country of Japan.
2.        The student will be able to locate Japan and bordering areas as well as the major features of the country.
3.        The student will be able to name the major islands, bodies of water, and cities on an outline map.
4.        The student will make comparisons of size, location, and population density between Japan and other countries.
5.        Measure/calculate distance on a variety of maps (e.g., map scales, etc.).
6.        Analyze geographic information using social studies tools (e.g., graphs, timelines, maps, charts, globes, technology, etc..).
7.        Identify cardinal and intermediate directions on maps.
8.        Evaluate land use with a variety of maps (e.g., farming, industrial, recreation, housing, etc..).          
9.        Explain map essentials (e.g., scale, map symbols, elevation, etc.).
10.        Interpret special purpose maps and their uses (e.g., climate, vegetation, population, topographic, etc..).

J.  Judo
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the sports of Japan.
2.        The students will compare and contrast the popular sports in Japan to those in the U.S.
3.        The students will research the art of Judo.
4.        The students will compare and contrast Judo to other forms of martial arts.

K.  Kimono
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the traditional clothing of Japan.
2.        The students will practice dressing in a Kimono in the classroom.
3.        The students will research the folding and colors of kimonos.


L. Lanterns
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the history of lanterns and how they are used in Japan.
2.        The students will create a paper lantern.

M.  Modern Technology of Japan
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the products that are exported from Japan.
2.        The students will research the new age technology that comes from Japan.
3.        The students will explore to find out what products in their own homes are made in Japan or other Asian Countries.

N.  Nippon “Land of the Rising Sun”
Objectives:
1.        The students will research each time period of Japan from 710 A.D. to present day.
2.        The students will create a time line of important historical events of Japan.

O.  Origami
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the art of folding paper in Japan called Origami.
2.        The students will learn how to fold different types of animals.
3.        The students will create a chart that explains what animals have significant meanings in Japan. (ex. Crane)

P.  Puppet
Objectives:
1.        The students will research on different forms of puppetry and theater in Japan.
2.        The students will create a Bunraku puppet.
3.        The students will have the opportunity to dramatize a folktale through puppetry.
4.        The students will also learn about Kyogen and Kabuki theatre.

Q.  Questions about the climate in Japan
Objectives:
1.        The students will look at weather maps to learn about the seasons of Japan.
2.        The student will be able to explain how different variables influence the climate of Japan.
3.        The students will look at weather maps and research data to understand the climate of Japan.
4.        The students will look at the time zone difference between Japan and the United States.

R.   Recognize the interrelatedness of language, literature, and culture  
Objectives:
1.        The students will read different forms of Japanese literature.
2.        The students will look at the Japanese alphabet and other forms of writing. (Kana and Kanji)
3.        The students will learn how to make some basic symbols in Japanese.
4.        The students will learn how to write their names in Japanese.

S.  Sadako
Objectives:
1.        The students will research dates and events of World War II in relationship to  Hiroshima. (creating a time line of events)
2.        The students will interview parents, grandparents, and friends to find out what Americans remember from this time.
3.        The students will read the book: Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes.
4.        The students will look at story elements, author’s purpose and more through this book.
5.        The students will write essays on what they believe it will take to have World Peace.
6.        The students and their families will take part in the art of origami by folding one thousand paper cranes in honor of  Sadako and Hiroshima.  

T. Traditions of Japan
Objectives:
1.        The students will research a formal tea ceremony in order to learn what all takes place during the ceremony.
2.        The students will learn what the hostess does during the ceremony.
3.        The students will learn how green tea is made.
4.        The students will have the opportunity to taste green tea.
5.        To understand that fans are part of the cultural tradition of Japan.
6.        To create fans that incorporate design techniques and ornamentation similar to that used in Japan.
7.        To use the fan as an aid to expressive action.

U.  Umani
Objectives:                                                                                        
1.   The students will learn about the different forms of Japanese cooking. (Examples: Tempura, Sushi, Kaiseki Dinner, Yakitori, Udon/Ramen)
2.   The students will look at photos of the different types of foods and try to guess what       
ingredients are used in each one.
3.   The students will explore the traditions that are used in many Japanese restaurants.
(Examples: food displays, removal of shoes, entrances to the restaurant etc..)

V.  Volcanoes
Objectives:
1.        The students will create a large map of Japan and draw and label the active volcanoes of Japan.
2.        The students will look at the area that makes up the Ring of Fire in the Pacific Ocean.
3.        The students will label and explain the Ring of Fire.
4.        The students will create a large map of Japan and draw and label the most famous mountains of Japan.  
5.        The students will create a line graph that shows the different elevations of the most famous mountains in Japan.
6.        The students will create a large map of Japan that illustrates famous gardens and temples of Japan.

W.  Wood Block Print
Objectives:
1.        The students will explore wood block printing in Japan.
2.        The students will create a wood block print.

X.  Xylophone (A musical Instrument, the Japanese school children enjoy learning how to play     
musical instruments)
Objectives:
1.        The students will learn how music and art are very important in the schools of Japan.
2.        The students will see a clip of elementary students performing with musical instruments.
3.        The students will learn about popular instruments used in Japan.

Y.  Year
Objectives:
1.        The students will research the Japanese New Year.
2.        The students will learn about the traditions related to the Japanese New Year.
3.        The students will learn about the calendar school year in Japan.

Z.  Zen
Objectives:
1.        The students will learn the meaning of the word Zen.
2.        The students will research the history of this common practice in Japan.
3.        The students will role-play a Zen experience in the classroom.
Melody Shaw